It could be said that imagery is the writer’s way of painting a picture in the readers’ minds. Figurative language refers to the color we use to amplify our writing. Explore examples of figurative language to add impact to your writing. It often has different meaning or intentions beyond the ways in which the word or phrase is typically used. PubMed.

I take thee at thy word. that which we call a rose: By any other name would smell as sweet; So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d, Retain that dear perfection which he owes: 50: Without that title. That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.’ Shakespeare W. Romeo and Juliet, II, ii(47–48) Leonard H Sigal * Corresponding author. That which we call a rose" is from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. What’s ‘Montague’? It uses an ordinary sentence to refer to something without directly stating it. You are what you are, even though you may be a Montague. Imagery uses rich, figurative language to describe characters, settings and scenes to build a mental image for the reader, appealing to their senses. Figurative speech from William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" Act II, scene II that Juliet used in line 25-26: “What’s in a name? Search for other works by this author on: Oxford Academic. This page has lots of examples of figurative language and … PubMed. Rose would have the same fragrance even If it would be named differently. Romeo, lose your name. Figurative language is a way to engage your readers, guiding them through your writing with a more creative tone. Search for other works by this author on: Oxford Academic. J.3100, PRI, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Route 206 and Provinceline Road, Princeton, NJ 08543-4000, USA. 4. Rose would have the same fragrance even If it would be named differently. Figurative language can operate at any scale from the sentence level to the entire composition.

It takes an ordinary statement and dresses it up in an evocative frock.

She ponders it. The quote "What's in a name? It isn’t hand or foot or arm or face or any other part belonging to a man. What’s in a name?

What's Montague? Visceral affect: Because figurative language can both impact the rhythm and sound of language, and also connect the abstract (say, love) with the concrete (say, a rose), it can help language make an almost physical impact on a reader. B. Figurative language refers to a language that deviates from the conventional order and meaning in order to convey a complicated meaning, colorful writing, clarity, or evocative comparison. She thinks Romeo has a sweet-sounding name.

O, be some other name! William Shakespeare — ‘What's in a name? What’s in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet; So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd, Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without that title.

Whats in a name that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. That which we call a rose/By any other word would smell as sweet./So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called," Juliet is indirectly saying that just like a rose that will always smell sweet by whichever name it is called; she will like Romeo even if he changes his name. Rom. E-mail: [email protected] 'Tis but thy name that is my enemy; Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. J.3100, PRI, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Route 206 and Provinceline Road, Princeton, NJ 08543-4000, USA. While the walk itself was only about an hour and a half, the experience was bookended by fun activities and educational exercises. The thing we call a rose would smell just as sweet if we called it by any other name. Understanding figurative language is an important part of reading the “What’s in a name? Romeo, doff thy name; And for that name, which is no part of thee, Take all myself. It’s only your name that’s the enemy. Learn who said it and what it means at eNotes.com D. The love she feels for Romeo reminds her of a rose . Trade in your name—which really has nothing to do with you—and take all of me in exchange. The reference is often used to imply that the names of things do not affect what they really are.

Romeo, doff … Figurative language refers to a language that deviates from the conventional order and meaning in order to convey a complicated meaning, colorful writing, clarity, or evocative comparison. Why Use Figurative Language? She wishes Romeo would change his name.