They act as water sources and purifiers. These species use wetlands to feed and have babies. Just as bad jungles became good rainforests, so bad swamps and mires have become good wetlands. But in the ecological world, draining swamps is a really bad idea. Says FWS's Perry, "The local people have come up with all these zoning ordinances and regulations to stop people from filling in their wetlands, and the federal government now issues a general permit that allows them to do it.


Ryan Wiseman. They also provide habitats for wildlife. Why wetlands are so important Donald Trump has claimed that he wants to "drain the swamp" in Washington. Wetlands serve an important function as “recycling stations” of sorts, collecting organic litter in the form of dead plant matter and animal waste and reducing it to usable nutrients again. Hong Kong’s vast Mai Po Marshes are a prime example of the importance of wetlands and why if we as a global network ignore the threat to our wetlands we will continue to lose the many bird and fish species that rely on these biomes for their homes. For example, herons nest in large old trees, but need shallow areas in order to wade for fish and aquatic life.

The bad news is that the Army Corps of Engineers' relaxed approach to wetlands development could undermine such efforts. They protect our shores. One of the reasons why it is said that wetlands offer a buffer to flooding is due to the fact that water that gathers in wetland areas slows down to a much slower velocity than it would otherwise have, allowing wetlands to be able to store, in some instances, up to 60 days of floodwaters – that would have done a lot to help protect New Orleans.
Why Wetlands Matter Home » Wetlands » Why Wetlands Matter. Reinventing wetlands for the modern world Smart farmers don’t destroy wetlands; they maintain and use them. Help stop flooding in the areas surrounding the wetland, as they act like a giant sponge and soak up all the water. BLOOMP . Although modern legislation has greatly slowed wetland loss, the U.S. continues to lose almost 60,000 acres per year. Like all water, wetland water has a pH measurement. Can take the bad chemicals out of our water, making water safer for us to drink. Wetlands are large expanses of land with a high percentage of water or wet areas, like marshes and swamps. They are rich in nature and vital to human life. Why wetlands are important Wetlands perform many functions and are vital for environmental, economic, social and cultural reasons. Sadly, wetlands are threatened by many human activities. Wetlands help to counter balance the human effect on rivers by rejuvenating them and surrounding ecosystems. They are the planet’s greatest natural carbon stores. Why do we need wetlands? Threats to wetlands. They are extremely important for the health of the environment, because they purify rain and waste water before it enters larger rivers, lakes and oceans. The threats to wetlands continue as many of the wetlands are still being drained, destroyed and replaced with agricultural fields, commercial and residential urban developments. Wetlands are important for a number of reasons. In the case of coastal wetlands, many are still cleared for aquaculture (fish and shrimp ponds). Many animals that live in other habitats use wetlands for migration or reproduction. You can tell how our views have changed by the name. Since colonial times, over half of the wetlands in the lower 48 states have been lost due to development, agriculture and silviculture, including 20% of Maine's wetlands. Wetlands are important because they: Are the home to many species of plants and animals, such as fish and frogs. Help stop flooding in the areas surrounding the wetland, as they act like a giant sponge and soak up all the water. Yet it's not all bad news. Wetlands are important because they: Are the home to many species of plants and animals, such as fish and frogs. Can take the bad chemicals out of our water, making water safer for us to drink. The destruction of wetlands also negatively impacts the lives of millions of humans that depend on the ecosystem …